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T

HE

G

REAT

J

EWELRY

M

ELTDOWN

Trading Post Times

Page 2

Not so long ago, people would

write to us or call us to confirm

the size of a favorite piece of

jewelry that they had seen on

our River Trading Post website.

These days, people write to us

asking how many grams a clas-

sic old piece of jewelry weighs.

We thought that a bit curious

until we discovered that the

price of silver has grown by

30% during the past year, and

silver prices are at a 30-year

high.

Suddenly we understood. These

“buyers” aren’t interested in the

art. They only want the metal.

We, at River Trading Post, are

not in the metals business, al-

though we see the escalating

price of silver reflexted in the

price of today’s jewelry.

A metal shopper just might find

some great silver prices in our

old jewelry collection.

We may be a bit old fashioned,

and perhaps a bit naïve, but we

see more than a chunk of pre-

cious metal in the old pieces.

We see a timeless value that

transcends the value of the

metal from which it was made.

More and more, metal shop-

pers are finding their way into

our galleries.

As they do, they quickly dis-

cover that River Trading Post is

not a silver mine. We simply

will not sell any piece if we

believe it is destined for a melt-

down.

We work very hard to find

wonderful jewelry for our

friends. We could melt it down

ourselves. But we believe there

is something about these pieces

that is worth much more than

the metal.

Pahponee is known for her

beautiful dragonfly pottery, the

inspiration drawn from her

Great Lakes ancestry.

“The dragonfly is one of na-

tures messengers, bringing in-

formation from the Spirit

World. They are good omens.”

See Pahponee’s work at River

Trading Post and our website.

Pahponee is of Kickapoo and

Potawatomi descent, originally

from the Great Lakes region.

Her Kickapoo name, Pah-

ponee, translates into “Snow

Woman.”

An IACA Artist of the Year

(1999), creates distinctive pot-

tery with sophisticated and

graceful form.

P

AHPONEE

S

D

RAGONFLY

P

OTTERY

A

T

RTP

zona and New Mexico recently

have sent notices to sellers re-

garding Indian Arts and Sales

Practices resulting from the

recent prosecution of several

businesses that misrepresented

jewelry and other items as be-

ing authentic Native American

art.

The law also prohibits Native

American people from misrep-

resenting the items that they sell

(including misrepresenting fake

turquoise as being the real

thing).

The laws are intended to pro-

tect and preserve authentic

American Indian Art, and the

people that create and ulti-

mately purchase the work.

Recent federal and state legisla-

tion has become tougher on

people that misrepresent items

they sell as being American

Indian made.

Federal Legislation (H.R. 725:

Indian Arts and Crafts Amend-

ments Act of 2010) provides for

criminal actions that can be

brought against the sale of mis-

represented goods or products.

The Attorneys General of Ari-

LAWS T

IGHTEN

ON

M

I SREPRESENTED

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

A

RT

New Laws Crack

Down to Preserve and

Protect American

Indian Art

It takes very little time to turn a timeless

piece of old jewelry into a silver puddle.

Pahponee

Pahponee’s dragonfly pottery is

inspired by her Great Lakes

ancestry