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A

LTHEA

C

AJERO

J

OINS

T

HE

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

A

RTI ST

F

AMILY

Trading Post Times

Page 2

We have known Althea Cajero

for nearly a decade, and have

quietly watched her blossom

into one of today’s very top

American Indian jewelers.

Althea is of Santo Domingo

and Acoma descent. Her mom,

Dorothy Tortalita, was a silver-

smith and her dad, Tony, was a

lapidary jeweler, and a tribal

leader of Santo Domingo

Pueblo.

Althea’s appreciation of art

came from growing up with it.

She knew that one day art

would be a part of her life, not

really knowing whether it

would be through collecting,

selling, or creating it.

We believe that question has

been answered, and Althea has

discovered the reason why.

Althea tells us, “My under-

standing of my creativity is that

it can be a deeper expression

from my soul. My experience

in creating jewelry is that I am

continually learning who I am

and what I can do.”

Through sweat, effort and pure

inspiration, Althea is creating

spectacular work, as you can

see in the images to your right.

See Althea’s work at RTP

Santa Fe, and on our website.

is over $200 in value, we pro-

vide them with a

River Trading

Post Collector’s Certificate

that

documents the item, and en-

sures our friends that should

they decide to “trade up” an

item in their collection, we will

give them credit for their full

purchase price of the original

item toward the price of their

new piece.

American Indian Art buyers

always should expect a certifi-

cate of authenticity with their

purchase.

At River Trading Post, we not

only provide that, but take it a

step further.

When a collector purchases a

weaving, pot, kachina doll or a

piece of Plains art from us that

The River Trading Post Collec-

tor’s Certificate is not only a

great way to catalog purchases,

but provides assurance that

items in the collection hold

their value when a collector

decides on trading up to that

next, more expensive piece of

American Indian Art.

RTP C

OLLECTOR

S

C

ERTIFICATE

E

NABLES

C

OLLECTOR

S

TO

T

RADE

U

P

In the Hopi culture, the groom and his male relatives weave fine

wedding clothes for the bride, a process that may take months.

The bride will appear dressed in the white wedding robe, white

deerskin boots and a black manta. Her face will be painted white,

and in her arms she will carry another robe identical to the one

that she is wearing. The second robe will be in a “suitcase” made

of willow twigs, and rain sash symbolizing fertility. She eventually

will be wrapped in that one when her life ends, and she will be

buried in it for her trip to the cloud country, where cloud people

reside.

Today, such a rare ensemble (right) is on display, and available at

River Trading Post, Scottsdale. It includes two wedding robes, a

reed wrapping mat, moccasins, and rain sash. You can find

additional information on our website,

www.rivertradingpost.com

.

H

OPI

W

EDDING

E

NSEMBLE

D

I SPLAYED

AT

RTP

S

COTTSDALE

Santo Domingo/Acoma artist Althea

Cajero has emerged as one of today’s very

finest American Indian jewelers.