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Art fits into nearly every life-

style and décor.

From the most elegant contem-

porary Indian jewelry, through

the world class weaving of the

Navajo, to ancient Pre-

Columbian pottery, the spec-

trum of American Indian art is

truly spectacular.

People frequently ask, “Is

American Indian Art a good

investment?”

Our opinion is that American

Indian Art is a great investment

in

yourself

. Be it a precious

bracelet, a personal museum of

Hopi kachina dolls or a won-

derful sculpture as a centerpiece

in your home, American Indian

Art will always reward you in a

very special way.

Go Ahead. Spoil yourself.

You’re worth it.

Nothing can enhance your fa-

vorite room, your office, or

your wardrobe as can a work of

original American art. Perhaps

an American antique, or brace-

let?

And what is more American

than

American

Indian Art

?

American Indian Art is as beau-

tiful and as diverse as all other

art forms. Be it antique or con-

temporary, American Indian

G

O

A

HEAD

. S

POIL

Y

OURSELF

. Y

OU

RE

W

ORTH

I

T

Volume 9, Issue 3

Page 3

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: T

ONTO

R

UINS

For shear enjoyment, take a trip

on the Apache Trail on your

next visit to Scottsdale. You

will find a beautiful 40 mile

stretch of steep, winding, and

mostly unpaved road, that

snakes through dense saguaro

forests, past several miles of

deep blue lakes, and through an

unlikely town called Tortilla

Flats.

You also will discover the

home of ancient Salado people

amid the wind, sun and desert

creatures, and you can roam

through the mud-plastered

structures that have been

around since around 1050 A.D.

Years ago, these hills bustled

with human life, people work-

ing and children playing. These

were the Salado people who

thrived in the desert wilderness

until about 1450 A.D.

It is not known why the Salado

moved into hillside caves, but

speculation says it a growing

population simply forced some

of the people to move up the

hill.

The Salado story is told

through the skillfully painted

pottery, woven fabrics and

other remains that lay undis-

turbed for centuries just beneath

the surface of the rugged

ground.

Unfortunately, a lack of na-

tional policies to protect this

place nearly resulted in the loss

of any evidence that the Salado

people ever existed, due to ig-

norance, greed or perhaps both.

The Antiquities act of 1906

saved Tonto, and the history of

the Salado people survived to

tell us stories about an unwrit-

ten past.

Getting to the ruins is a steep

climb, but the way is paved.

And the drive along the Apache

Trail is worth the effort.

“Investing in yourself usually is

a very good option. American

Indian art is one way to realize

personal dividends over the

long run.”

F

OUR

G

REAT

C

OLLECTOR

E

XPERIENCES

River Trading Post

314 N. River Street

Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

610 B. Canyon Road

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

505-982-2805

7033 E. Main Street

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

www.rivertradingpost.com

Whether you are decorating

your home or are an avid col-

lector of fine American Indian

art, you will find River Trading

Post has a great mix of historic

and contemporary art from

over 50 tribal nations.

Come visit. Enjoy!

Dundee

RTP On-Line

Scottsdale

Santa Fe

Tonto Ruins site high above the Apache

Trail. It was home to the Salado people

from 1050 until around 1450 AD.