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Trading Post Times

A chapter in River Trading Post

history ended on May 31, 2013

as River Trading Post said fare-

well to Santa Fe.

The difficult decision to leave

the great old adobe gallery was

driven by a difficult economy in

the overall art market, which

hit Santa Fe and Canyon Road

in a significant way.

During its nearly nine year run

on Canyon Road, River Trad-

ing Post made many great

friends. We would especially

like to thank them for making

River Trading Post, Santa Fe,

the wonderful place that it was.

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

B

IDS

F

AREWELL

TO

S

ANTA

F

E

W

HEN

I

T

C

OMES

T

O

I

NDIAN

A

RT

, W

HAT

I

S

A

N

I

NDIAN

?

Since 1990, the test of Ameri-

can Indian Art

authenticity

has

been guided by the Indian Arts

and Crafts Act .

The act is a truth-in-advertising

law that prohibits misrepresen-

tation in marketing American

Indian or Alaska Native arts

and crafts in the United States.

Under the act, it is illegal to

offer, display or sell any art or

craft in a manner that falsely

suggests it is Indian produced.

Under the Act, an Indian is

defined as a member of any

federally or State recognized

Indian Tribe, or an individual

certified as an Indian artisan by

an Indian Tribe.

In March 2013, Rep. Nick Ra-

hall II [D-WV3] introduced a

bill to clarify (change) the defi-

nition of an Indian and an In-

dian Organization.

Under the proposed bill, an individ-

ual artist would no longer be re-

quired to be a tribal member, or

certified by an Indian Tribe

.

The artist would simply have to

belong to an “Indian Organiza-

tion” that is chartered as a sec-

tion 501(c)3 organization

within the State where the or-

ganization is headquartered,

and that is dedicated to preserv-

ing Native American principles,

traditions, culture, history, lan-

guage and arts.

The Indian Arts and Crafts

Association has taken a strong

position against the bill.

We believe that Rep. Rahall’s

proposed exclusion of Tribal

requirements under the present

Act undermines the principle

of

authenticity,

and opens the

door to anyone to stake a claim

as an Indian artist.

American Indian art is driven

by the many American Indian

cultures...all of which are tri-

bally based. We maintain that

this is as it should be. For the

protection of consumers, collec-

tors, and true American Indian

artists.

Volume 10, Issue 3

July:September 2013

SPECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST:

Santa Fe Indian Market, Santa

Fe, NM. August 17 - 18.

Traditional Pueblo Arts

Pottery Exhibit and Sale

Ongoing

River Trading Post, Scottsdale

Scottsdale, AZ

Indian Summer Festival. Milwau-

kee, WI. September 6 - 7.

R i v e r T r a d i n g P o s t

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Native Art: It Isn’t Just

For Grown Ups

2

Favorite Places: Hoodoo

Land

3

Protect Your American

Indian Art Collection

3

Collector’s Treasure: The

Apache Basket

4

Ancestor’s Song

Closes

Out

2

Congressman Nick Rahall II wants

to redefine an American Indian

Artist.