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Volume 10, Issue 3

Page 3

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: H

OODOOS

OF

U

TAH

AND

A

RIZONA

formation about the artist, title,

date, medium, size and current

condition. Also keep purchase

information, such as the gallery

where it was purchased, the

date, and any receipts or cata-

logs where the artwork ap-

peared. You should keep indi-

vidual photographs of the art-

work.

If you are computer savvy, the

best way to do this is with a

database, or other file that in-

cludes a picture of the piece.

Keep a copy of your collection

information with other estate

planning documents in a safety

deposit box, or other place

away from your collection.

This may take a bit of time, but

in the unlikely event that some-

thing unexpected does happen,

you will have a basis for mak-

ing your claim. Better safe than

sorry.

We’ve heard sad tales from

people who have had a treas-

ured piece lost, stolen or dam-

aged and have no basis for fil-

ing either a police report or an

insurance claim. Very sad in-

deed.

So here is a must do tip from us

to you:

Keep Records.

You should

create a detailed record of your

art collection that includes in-

P

ROTECT

Y

OUR

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

A

RT

C

OLLECTION

W

ITH

R

ECORDS

For piece of mind, be certain to

keep an inventory of your

American Indian art collection.

T

HREE

G

REAT

C

OLLECTOR

E

XPERIENCES

River Trading Post

314 N. River Street

Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

7033 E. Main Street

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

www.rivertradingpost.com

Whether you are decorating

your home or are an avid col-

lector of fine American Indian

art, you will find River Trading

Post has a great mix of historic

and contemporary art from

over 50 tribal nations.

Come visit. Enjoy!

Dundee

RTP On-Line

Scottsdale

Like soldiers guarding a sacred

spot on this earth, the amazing

Hoodoos are awe-inspiring to

folks traveling the badlands of

the Southwest.

A hoodoo is variously defined

as “bad luck,” “a person or

object that brings bad luck” or

“a fantastically shaped pillar of

rock left behind by eons of ero-

sion.”

Whatever description you

choose, the hoodoos truly are

awe inspiring, making many

skyscrapers of New York and

Chicago look like child’s toys.

Some call these great forma-

tions a “Fairy Chimney,” an

“Earth Pyramid” or a “Tent

Rock.”

Hoodoos are not a specific

place, but they abound in can-

yons, particularly in Arizona

(Chiricahua Mountains) and

Utah (Brice Canyon.)

These canyon soldiers were

formed by weathering proc-

esses, including over 200 freeze

and thaw cycles each

year...over thousands of years.

Rain also helps to sculpt the

hoodoos.

Many hoodoos are capped with

a magnesium-rich limestone

called dolomite...a favorite

stone of Zuni fetish carvers.

A drive through hoodoo terri-

tory early in the morning, or at

sunset is when these creatures

of nature are the most spectacu-

lar...and about the only time

when your camera can capture

their real beauty and colors.

For a breath taking family ex-

perience, a tour through Hoo-

doo land is one of the best.

Hoodoos Dominate Bryce Canyon, Utah

Hoodoo Soldiers Guard a Canyon