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H

OW

D

O

Y

OU

S

ELL

Y

OUR

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

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Trading Post Times

Page 2

Each and every day, we receive

inquiries from people that want

to sell their American Indian

art pieces.

As with any art, disposing of an

American Indian art collection

on the secondary market can be

a huge challenge.

The challenge is compounded

because many people believe

that their art is worth a lot of

money...a lot of money.

Here are some tips on how to

approach selling your treasures,

and some things to keep in

mind in while doing so.

1. Have good pictures of your

items, including prove-

nance and the price that

you paid for the item.

2. Have your items either

appraised or evaluated to

get a price benchmark for

each item. Or do your own

research on the Internet for

current prices of compara-

ble items. (You can learn

about the River Trading

Post valuation service on

our website.)

3. Do not expect top dollar

for art created by an active

artist.

4. Do expect to realize about

50% to 60% of what you

paid for your item, or the

valuation price of your

item.

If you have these in order, in-

cluding lowering your expecta-

tion of your potential return,

then explore the following

channels.

1. A direct sale to another

collector. This will pro-

vide the highest return to

you, but can be very diffi-

cult to do.

2. Consign your art to a repu-

table gallery. Typically

you will pay a 40% to 50%

consignment fee to the

gallery for it to market

your art.

3. Place your art on auction

at a reputable American

Indian art auction house.

These tips should be helpful to

you when it comes time to dis-

pose of your American Indian

art collection.

helping with car repairs.

Toadlena is the source of the

Two Grey Hills weavings,

among the very finest weavings

in the world.

Fact is, Toadlena today serves

over 175 Navajo families, by

buying weavings, selling wool,

Since the 1870’s the Toadlena

Trading Post has served as a

social and trading center for the

Navajo people.

The place has provided a place

of comfort to Navajo people for

years. Providing money in

exchange for blankets, and even

and serving cars and trucks.

Today, River Trading Post pro-

vides an outreach market for

the Toadlena weavers with a

great selection of Toadlena

Two Grey Hills weavings.

Visit with us to enjoy and to

learn morel

A H

ISTORIC

T

RADING

P

OST

AND

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

W

ORK

T

OGETHER

T

O

S

UPPORT

N

AVAJO

W

EAVERS

AND

F

AMILIES

attempted to block the auction

sale, but Paris courts gave the

go-ahead.

Gregory Annenberg

Weingarten, director of the

Annenberg Foundation, had

other thoughts. “These are not

trophies to have on one’s man-

tel; they are truly sacred works

for the Native Americans.”

The result? 24 items were pur-

chased and returned to their

home tribes.

The Annenberg Foundation

comes from the fortune of Wal-

ter Annenberg, former publish-

er of

TV Guide

and

Seventeen

Magazine..

Annenberg was a

U.S ambassador to the United

Kingdom, and founder of the

Annenberg School of Commu-

nications at the University of

Pennsylvania.

Family-run charity, The An-

nenberg Foundation, recently

returned 21 kachina masks to

the Hopi tribe and three sacred

headdresses to the Apache

tribe.

The cost? $530,000 was the

price paid to

auction house

Neret-Minet Tessier & Sarrou,

Paris.

Attorneys for the Hopi tribe

F

OUNDATION

P

AYS

$530 , 000 T

O

R

ETURN

T

RIBAL

O

BJECTS

Part of a $530,000 collection re-

turned to home tribes by the

Annenberg Foundation