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Trading Post Times

Page 2

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

A

RTIST

C

LEANS

H

OUSE AT

2015 H

EARD

M

USEUM

I

NDIAN

M

ARKET

Hopi Kachina Doll carver, Raynard Lalo left the 2015 Heard Museum Indian Market and headed back to the

Hopi mesas with first and second place ribbons and a bit of cash in his pocket for his exceptional kachina doll

carvings.

Raynard is a featured artist at River Trading Post, and on occasion may be found carving his work in our Scotts-

dale gallery. Your can see his dolls in our Dundee and Scottsdale galleries, as well as on the River Trading Post

website.

Raynard, of the Spider Clan, has been carving since 1998 when he was just 15 years-old. He carves the traditional

old style dolls, using only cottonwood root for the figure, and crushes natural earth pigments for paint.

A favorite of Raynard’s is to carve female and male pairs. Though strictly traditional, they also can be whimsical,

such as his frog pair shown at the right.

While known best for his carving, Raynard also has the booming voice of a traditional singer. He and his fellow

Hopi drummers are frequently featured at River Trading Post, Scottsdale.

You can learn more about Raynard and many other River Trading Post artists at our library on the River Trading

Post website.

Raynard Lalo carves at

River Trading Post,

Scottsdale

A Dazzling War Shirt From a Forgotten Pueblo

The Yesleta del Sur Pueblo is one that few people know about. Yet

it is a federally recognized tribe and a sovereign nation known as

Tigua. It was established in 1682, and today consists of about 1,600

citizens. It is located just north of the Rio Grand river near El Paso,

Texas.

Today, tribal member Rudy Silvas toils at recreating the tribal war

shirts of a time long past. A time as forgotten as the Tigua people

themselves.

One of Silvas’ war shirts is on display at River Trading Post, Dundee

and on the River Trading Post website.

The shirt is ablaze with action and color. As you look at the piece, it

literally appears to be in motion.

Built from cowhide, the shirt is embellished with finely beaded red trade cloth, brass medallions, horse hair and bone hair pipe. To top it

off, 100 brass bullet casings provide jingle sounds for a pow-wow dancer.

The shirt was created for a big guy, measuring 20.5” shoulder to shoulder ,with 25” long sleeves and is 39” from top to bottom.

This war shirt from the forgotten Tigua people is a museum, or collector’s, classic. It is full of color and action that can’t be captured in

a picture.