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Phone: 866-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, IL 60118

A

NTIQUE

A

COMA

P

OTTERY

: W

HERE

B

EAUTY

AND

H

I STORY

I

NTERSECT

cross-hatched patterns that sym-

bolized rain. Lightning, thun-

der clouds, mountains, the in-

fluences of the cycle of life, and

water and sky were frequent

themes.

The designs were applied with

the spike of a yucca made into a

brush by chewing.

Upon completion, the potter

would lightly strike the side of

the pot, holding it to their ear.

If the pot did not ring, the piece

was known to have cracked in

the firing process and would be

destroyed and ground into

shards for future use.

Today, old Acoma pottery is

not only revered for its unique

artistic characteristics, but be-

Fifty miles west of Albuquerque

is the historic Acoma pueblo

where pottery making dates

back more than 1,000 years.

Pottery was functional, and was

used for storage, cooking and

eating. Water jugs were used

by Acoma men for long hunt-

ing trips.

The local dense clay made for

the perfect medium for pottery.

Potters dried the clay and

strengthened it by adding of

pulverized pottery shards and

sand. They hand-coiled, paint-

ed and fired the piece using

dung for fuel.

Geometric patterns, thunder-

birds and rainbows were the

traditional designs, as were

cause of its immensely rich

historic value.

River Trading Post features a

select grouping of the rare old

Acoma work, as well as classic

old work from Zuni, Zia and

Laguna pueblos.

The old pieces also are featured

on the Pottery section of River

Trading Post website under

Museum Classics.

Arts of Native America

This Acoma polychrome storage pot dates

back to 1890, and is a classic example of

the old work.

Even with the ladle wear around the rim,

the beauty of this classic Acoma pot still

shines through.