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As SWAIA prepares for its

93rd annual Santa Fe Indian

Market, the waters for cash

strapped SWAIA are choppy.

Shortly after SWAIA COO

John Torres-Nez unexpectedly

resigned from that post, he im-

mediately spearheaded the for-

mation of the

Indigenous Fine

Art Market,

that calls for an

Indian Market “shake-up.”

The shake-up is a result of

many artists wanting a greater

voice in how their market is

produced.

While SWAIA is firmly en-

trenched, the new Torres-Nez

led group will hold its own

separate market that coincides

with the traditional Santa Fe

Indian Market at the Santa Fe

Railyard.

Clearly, there is a rebellion

against the traditional SWAIA

market. Chances of success?

Time will tell.

P

ASSING

H

ANDS

B

ABY

B

OOMERS

C

REATE

A G

REAT

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

A

RT

BUYING OPPORTUNITY

.

Trading Post Times

T

URBULANCE

F

OR

SWAIA I

NDIAN

M

ARKET

As the Baby Boomer generation

ages, it is trading the

McMansion for something a bit

smaller, perhaps next to a golf

course, or a small lake that is

nearby. With the kids grown

and beginning families of their

own, mom and dad no longer

need as much living space, es-

pecially on retirement income.

They want to downsize.

As Baby Boomers downsize,

an abundance of wonderful old

American Indian art is return-

ing to the market, making to-

day’s American Indian Art

market one of the most attrac-

tive art markets since the

1960’s.

Back in the 1960’s the Baby

Boomers purchased art, includ-

ing American Indian art, be-

cause of the love for it. They

did not view art as a “stock

investment” but something that

brought meaning and enjoy-

ment to their life.

As the “Boomers” redesign

their lifestyles, American Indi-

an art is finding its way back

into the market, at prices that

are attractive to collectors eve-

rywhere.

Many of the “Boomers” simply

are looking for a new home for

their valued pieces, and not for

the financial return.

This has opened a totally new

market for collectors to acquire

American Indian art that is

within pocketbook range.

At

River Trading Post

we work

each day to connect the

“Boomers” precious collections

to the new generation of Ameri-

can Indian art collectors, in

order to pass the care taking

tradition from the old hands to

the new.

Volume 11, Issue 3

July:September 2014

SPECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST:

SWAIA 93rd Indian Market

August 18 - 24

Santa Fe, NM

Indigenous Fine Art Market

August 21 - 23

Santa Fe,NM

Indian Summer Festival

September 5 - 7

Milwaukee, WI

R i v e r T r a d i n g P o s t

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Matriarch of Crow Artists

Mary Lou Big Day

2

Breaking Bounds of

Native Art Tradition

2

Favorite Places: Iroquois

Indian Museum

3

Only You Can Protect

American Indian Art

3

Helping Native Kids for

25 Years

4

Baby Boomers Dispose of Art in favor of

a new lifestyle