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Volume 13, Issue 2

Page 3

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: N

AVAJOLAND

T

ACO

J

OINTS

Your Very Own Navajo Taco Place

What You Need

4-5 cups flour

3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup instant milk

2 cups water

1 1/2 pounds ground beef

1 chopped onion

2/4 teaspoon garlic salt

1 can pinto beans

What You Do

To make fry bread: Mix dry ingredients

Stir in Water

Knead dough lightly, cover and let rest 15

minutes

Heat 1” vegetable oil in a 10” skillet

Pinch off dough in small amounts and pat

dough into thin 8” circles

In the hot oil, quickly brown on both sides.

Drain on paper towels.

Brown ground beef and onion, drain

Add beans and garlic salt

Simmer 10 - 15 minutes

To Serve

Loosen your belt

Spoon filling onto your frybread

Top with grated cheese, salsa, lettuce,

tomatoes, onion, sour cream, green onion.

Dig In (Oh Boy!)

When we travel the dusty

roads of Navajo country,

there is nothing better than

seeing a friendly, neighbor-

hood Navajo Taco restaurant.

These places pull our car off

of the road like a magnet.

Oh, boy! A sumptuous

1,000+ calorie treat that is

just loaded with tasty lard,

and at a price that is just

about the lowest cost per cal-

orie treat anywhere in the world. People

think Navajo weavings are great, but just

wait until you taste one of these beauties.

These are an absolute art in and of them-

selves. And, a yummy one.

This epicurean delight blossomed from

humble beginnings. According to Navajo

tradition, frybread was created in 1864 using

the flour, sugar, salt and lard that was given

to them by the United States government

when they were forced from their Arizona

land to take a 300-mile journey, known as

the “Long Walk” to Bosque Redondo, New

Mexico, a land that did not support their

traditional staples of vegetables and beans.

When you travel the vast Navajo Country, hold on to your steering wheel. When the

tummy starts growling, and a Navajo Taco place appears, be prepared for your car to

have mind of its own as it points you to toward your 1,000+ calorie treat.

The great Navajo Taco joint. A continuing part of the great American landscape in

Navajoland.

River Trading Post

314 N. River Street

Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

7033 E. Main Street, 102

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

www.rivertradingpost.com

For over 15 years River Trading

Post has become renowned for its

diverse collection of American

Indian art, and as the friendliest

place around for exploring and

buying American Indian art.

Browse our galleries, visit our web-

site, and we believe you will find a

treasure with your name on it.

B

RINGING

Y

OU

T

HE

F

INEST

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

A

RT

F

OR

15 Y

EARS

.

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

Scottsdale

Dundee