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Volume 13, Issue 3

Page 3

O

PINION

: C

URSIVE

W

RITING AND

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

A

RT

Scholar Sabrina Holcomb put it this way. “Picture full-length mirrors reflecting an

empty dance studio where no one practices at the barre, while cameras from a terminat-

ed television class sit in a computer lab. How does music sound in a room where

instruments lie silent? And is the play still the thing in a theater that’s now merely a set

for an English class?”

Since the advent of “No Child Left Behind” the focus of schools has been on testing —

and test scores. Subjects relating to arts and culture in many public schools are viewed as incompatible. With the advent

of the keyboard many schools don’t even teach cursive writing, because it is not included in the Common Core standards.

Art, drama and penmanship are not required as it takes some subjectivity in order to score them and they aren’t consid-

ered “necessary.”

The shift away from engaging students in arts and culture has had a significant impact on every sector of the art world,

including American Indian art. National Endowments of the Arts surveys have shown a steady decline in every demo-

graphic group that participates in the art scene except for those over 75. Between 2002 and 2012 (the latest available num-

bers) individual participation in art events declined by 22%, and the trend continues.

Cursive writing helps dyslexic kids overcome reversal of letters because of the cursive flow. Understanding art and culture

enables students to understand that everything is not black and white, nor is there an absolute answer, as they will learn

later in life. How do you put a test score on that?

We have always known that art is what represents the culture and humanity of a people. As with all art forms, American

Indian art is well beyond the purview of today’s kids and the millennials. A rather sad situation for those who are masters

at the keyboard, but don’t even know how to sign their name.

River Trading Post

314 N. River Street

Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

7033 E. Main Street, 102

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

www.rivertradingpost.com

Going on 16 years now,

River Trading Post has become

renowned for its diverse collection

of American Indian art, and as the

friendliest place around for explor-

ing and buying American Indian

art.

Browse our galleries, visit our web-

site, and we believe you will find a

treasure with your name on it.

B

RINGING

Y

OU

T

HE

F

INEST

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

A

RT

F

OR

16 Y

EARS

.

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

Scottsdale

Dundee

Kathi Ouellet, Managing Director

at River Trading Post, Scottsdale

has been elected to the Board of

Directors of the prestigious Scotts-

dale Gallery Association, and will

serve as Treasurer for the associa-

tion.

Scottsdale is known as a mecca for

fine art collectors, being home to

over 100 fine art galleries. The

Scottsdale Gallery Association is a

non-profit organization formed by

professional art dealers to promote

these fine art galleries and the in-

ternationally famed weekly Art-

Walk.

Ouellet has managed River Trad-

ing Post’s Scottsdale Gallery for

fourteen years. She also currently

serves as the President of the Indi-

an Arts and Crafts Association,

and has been a judge for the Heard

Museum Guild Indian Market.

RTP’

S

O

UELLET

TO

S

COTTSDALE

G

ALLERY

A

SSOCATION

B

OARD

OF

D

IRECTORS