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T

HE

G

REAT

L

AW

OF

P

EACE

AND

THE

U.S.

C

ONSTITUTION

Trading Post Times

Did you know that the U.S. Constitution

was modeled in both principle and form on

the

Great Law of Peace

of the Iroquois people?

Indeed, in 1987 the U.S. Senate acknowl-

edged that the Great Law of Peace served as

a model for the Constitution of the United

States

(U.S. S. Con. Res. 76, 2 Dec. 1987.)

Fact is that George Washington, Ben Frank-

lin and Thomas Jefferson met frequently

with the Iroquois to become familiar with

the Great Law of Peace.

The Great Law of Peace included concepts

that are familiar to us today, including:

Freedom of speech

Freedom of religion

The right of women to participate in

government

Separation of powers

Checks and balances within the govern-

ment

Three branches of government

A Women’s Council, which was the

equivalent of the Supreme Court.

In 1776, several delegates from the Iroquois

confederacy attended the Continental Con-

gress as it wrote the Declaration of Inde-

pendence where the Constitution of the

United States was drafted.

Read more about the Iroquois people on page 2

Volume 14, Issue 3

July:Sept 2017

R i v e r T r a d i n g P o s t

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

People of the Longhouse 2

The Great Peacemaker

2

Favorite Places: Keepers

of the Longhouse

3

Peabody Award Winner

Joins RTP Artist Lineup

3

Navajo Kachinas. Real

or Not?

4

Prison Art

2

SPECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST:

SWAIA Indian Market

August 19 & 20

Santa Fe, New Mexico

IFAM Indoor Showcase

August 18 & 19

Santa Fe, New Mexico

Indian Summer Festival

September 8 through 10

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Background image: Constitution of the United States

Foreground photo: White Deer, a proud Mohawk ,at the

1901 Indian Congress, Pan-American Exposition

—Indian Country Media Network Image

Iroquois meet with the Continental Congress in 1776 as

the Declaration of Independence was drafted.