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S

ENATORS

AIM

TO

PUT

TEETH

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Trading Post Times

Volume 14, Issue 4

October:December 2017

SPECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST:

Tanner Jensen Demonstrates!

November 16, 6-9pm

River Trading Post, Scottsdale

Pueblo Seasonal Dances.

Please contact Pueblos for

dates and times.

R i v e r T r a d i n g P o s t

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Vintage Chimayo Purses 2

American Indian College

Fund and River Trading

Post

2

Artist Tanner Jenson

Joins RTP Family

3

Great Gift Ideas

4

New Mexico senator Tom Udall (right) aims to put new teeth into the Indian Arts

and Crafts Act of 1990 in order to shut down businesses that pass off imported goods

as authentic American Indian art.

Oversite and enforcement of the current Indian Arts and Crafts Act is up to the Indi-

an Arts and Crafts Bureau, which has a paltry budget of just over $1.3 million per

year with just 45 employees.

Meridith Stanton (left) heads up the Indian Arts and Crafts Bureau (IACB)

which is part of the Department of Interior. She has guided a number of major

busts that have resulted in the shut down and prosecution of many large

purveyors of fake American Indian art that was being passed off as Native

American made, but was actually imported from overseas.

Meridith and the IACB work closely with the FBI, Fish and Wildlife, and other federal agencies

to investigate, arrest and prosecute violators of the law. They also work closely with internet auc-

tion sites where there are many unknowing buyers. Many sellers don’t even know what they are

selling, having purchased these items under false pretenses from importers.

Currently, federal prosecutors in New Mexico are preparing for two trials in an ambitious investi-

gation that traced falsified Native American art from manufacturers in the Philippines to galleries

across the United States. Officials said they seized imported jewelry with a declared value of $11

million which would have fetched at least twice that price through retail sales.

In February, U.S. Attorney Damon Martinez (right) announced the

indictment of three New Mexicans charged with conspiring to import

and fraudulently sell Filipino-made items as Native American-made

jewelry. At left is Chairman of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board Har-

vey Pratt. (Photo: Adolphe Pierre-Louis/Albuquerque Journal) This

case has yet to come to trial due to several postponements.

Consumers can protect themselves from being victims of the fake imports by buying from a repu-

table source. Always check to see if your source is a member of either the Indian Arts and Crafts

Association (IACA) or the Antique Tribal Dealers Association (ATADA.)