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The black design symbolizes

the darkness (night) and the

clouds that bring rain.

The light part inside the black

design represents the sacred

mountains, while the outside

light area represents the dawn.

That is tied together with the

outside rim which represents a

person’s thoughts, prayers and

values.

The red part within the black

design represents the life giving

rays of the sun.

Leading from the center is a

pathway to the outer edge,

opening to the dawn in the east.

They say that this place can be

felt by a singer even in the dark.

It is the door path of long life

and everlasting beauty.

The Navajo ceremonial basket

is a very traditional cultural

item with many meanings in its

red and black design.

The basket is of sumac that has

been dyed reddish brown with

mountain mahogany root, juni-

per ashes and black alder. The

black is dyed with pinion pitch

and sumac leaves mixed with

powdered coal.

D

INE

´ T

S

´

AA

´ - T

HE

B

ASKET

O

F

M

EANINGS

Volume 2, Issue 2

Page 3

Acoma Pueblo: Sky City

Polacca. Her new mother-in-

law, Marcella Kahe, quickly

became her mentor, and taught

her how to make traditional

Hopi pottery. Today, Gloria

continues to use these tradi-

tional techniques, yet has

developed a bold style all her

own. Her precise painting and

trademark orange slip are in-

Your eyes are drawn across the

path of swirls and geometrics.

Vivid strokes in rich hues dance

across a beautiful orange slip,

bringing the intricate designs to

life. This is the work of award-

winning potter

Gloria Kahe

.

Gloria, who is Navajo, married

a Hopi man, Sam Kahe from

stantly recognizable, but it is

the way the design fits the

shape of the pot that makes this

potter’s work compelling.

Gloria’s pottery is a must-have

for any collection. It is available

at Pueblo Arts, located within

River Trading Post, Scottsdale

and at

www.puebloarts.com

.

C

OLLECTORS

P

RIZE

: G

LORIA

K

AHE

P

OTTERY

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: A

COMA

P

UEBLO

Some 7,000 feet above sea level

a massive sandstone mesa rises

367 feet above the valley below.

Atop that mesa, Acomans

claim, is the oldest continu-

ously inhabited city in the

United States, dating back

1,000 years or more.

Spanish conquerors learned of

this defensive stronghold when

they entered New Mexico in

the 1500’s. Indeed, the place

was nearly destroyed when

Gov. Juan de Oñate and 70 of

his men retaliated for the killing

of 13 Spanish soldiers as they

tried to take grain from the

storehouses.

As a gesture of peace, the

Spanish built the huge San

Estéban del Rey mission be-

tween 1629 and 1640. That

mission stands today amid the

adobe homes atop the mesa.

While fewer than 50 people live

on the mesa top year-round, on

feast days all of the people

gather on the mesatop.

Both the mission and the

pueblo have been designated as

Registered National Historical

landmarks.

In the valley below the mesa,

artists carry on the age old tra-

dition of creating pottery.

Sandra Victorino, Carolyn

Concho, Dorothy Torivio and

the Lewis family (progeny of

Lucy) are but a few of the out-

standing contemporary potters

who live in the shadow of the

mesa and continue a thousand

year old tradition.

Gloria Kahe’s designs dance

across her pottery