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Jeff believes in connecting with

the spirit of the clay as he cre-

ates his work. For every piece

he builds, each stage is accom-

panied by prayer and medita-

tion. Jeff hand-mixes the clay,

coils, polishes and carves, and

finally fires each piece in dung.

Jeff Roller also is a very accom-

plished horseman whose family

has been hunting the Jemez

Mountains for a thousand years

or more.

Today, Jeff guides hunts for

deer and elk throughout the

Jemez Mountains.

If you are in Santa Fe for

Indian Market, drop by River

Trading Post to visit with Jeff

Roller.

Santa Clara’s Jeff Roller has

joined the RTP lineup of world-

class Native American artists.

Jeff is the product of seven gen-

erations of potters, including his

mother, Toni Roller, and his

grandmother, Margaret Tafoya.

His work honors his grand-

mother, Margaret, and today it

is in great demand.

S

ANTA

C

LARA

S

J

EFF

R

OLLER

J

OINS

RTP A

RTIST

L

INEUP

Volume 3, Issue 3

Page 3

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: H

OVENWEEP

Paiute people call it

Hovenweep

,

meaning hidden valley. In a

remote area along the Utah/

Colorado border, towers jut

forth from bushy mesas that are

split by quite steep and narrow

ravines.

These mysterious towers were

built by ancestral Puebloans

somewhere between A.D. 500

and A.D. 1300. What was the

purpose of the towers in the

desert? Why were many of the

towers built on the valley floor?

They may have been celestial

observatories, civil buildings,

defensive structures, or all of

the above. Their actual reason

for being remains a mystery.

People started to settle here

around A.D. 900 where they

planted and harvested crops on

the rich mesa top. By the late

1200s the place was home to

more than 2500 people. By the

end of the century, Hovenweep

was empty.

The people headed south to-

ward the Rio Grande Valley

where their descendants live

today.

Today, Hovenweep is a Na-

tional Monument that protects

six prehistoric villages spread

over a twenty-mile stretch of

mesa tops. The area is remote,

and undeveloped.

One can’t help but marvel at

the beauty of the architecture at

this place. That is what makes

Hovenweep one of our favorite

places.

__________________

Right: The elegant towers of Hovenweep

rise from a canyon floor and from a mesa

rim.

Acoma is inviting all interested

individuals, groups and corpo-

rations to become “Friends of

Sky City Cultural Center”

founding members.

Sky City sits atop a sheer-

walled 370-foot sandstone mesa

in a valley studded with tower-

ing monoliths. Acomans claim

that Sky City is the oldest con-

tinuously inhabited community

in North America, going back

more than a thousand years.

Acoma Pueblo continues to be

home to many of today’s top

Native American artisans,

many of whom are featured at

River Trading Post.

Acoma Pueblo celebrated the

opening of its new 40,000

square-foot Haak’u Museum on

May 26.

The new museum will house

both permanent and traveling

exhibits that will offer insight

into Native American Culture.

The specific focus will be on the

1000-year cultural pathway of

the Acoma people.

A

COMA

P

UEBLO

O

PENS

N

EW

M

USEUM

,

C

ULTURAL

C

ENTER

Sky City sits atop a 370- foot sand-

stone mesa in northwest New Mexico

Classic Jeff Roller Pottery is

richly carved, perfectly shaped