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Later, the Russian fur trade

introduced glass beads in the

West.

Glass beads soon became

highly desirable in cultural de-

signs that were incorporated

into moccasins, pouches,

dresses, bandolier bags and

other accessories of the time.

Today, the art of creating fine

beadwork is nearly lost, and the

old items of fine beadwork have

become a collector’s treasure.

Some exceptional examples of

beadwork from many tribes can

be seen in each of our galleries,

and on our website. The pieces

are relics, the work is beautiful,

and the designs are absolutely

timeless.

During the early contact period

with Europeans, Native Ameri-

can people incorporated many

trade goods into their cultural

values. Many items, including

trade beads assumed a spiritual

helper status among many of

the tribal people.

Glass beads entered the eastern

Subartic at the start of the 17th

century via French fur traders.

I

NDIAN

B

EADWORK

A C

OLLECTOR

S

T

REASURE

Volume 4, Issue 1

Page 3

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: P

ECOS

P

UEBLO

About twenty-five miles east of

Santa Fe, NM, lie the remains

of the once powerful Pecos

Pueblo.

Two thousand people called the

place home during the 1400s,

where they were the trade hub

between the farmers of the Rio

Grande and plains tribes that

hunted the buffalo.

Because the pueblo was a trade

center, there was a blend of

tribes and cultures at Pecos. (In

fact today, some 13 tribes, in-

cluding Apache and Coman-

che, claim ties to the Pecos

people.

But the central culture was

Pueblean as can be seen from

the numerous kivas at Pecos.

During the 16th century the

Spanish descended on the

pueblo, and in 1625 the Catho-

lic missionaries erected a large

church outside the pueblo

walls.

The original church was de-

stroyed during the Pueblo Re-

volt of 1680, but a smaller

church was built in 1717 after

the Spanish re-conquest of the

area.

The last residents of Pecos left

for Jemez Pueblo in 1838.

Many return from Jemez on the

first Sunday of each August

however to celebrate the feast

of Our Lady of the Angels of

Porciuncula (after whom the

church is named.) The celebra-

tion is held in the standing re-

mains of the old church.

The remains can be seen today

via a 1.25 mile trail that winds

through the pueblo, kivas and

the church.

River Trading Post

314 N. River Street

Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

610 B. Canyon Road

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

505-982-2805

7140 E. 1st Avenue

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

Whether you are decorating

your home or are an avid col-

lector of fine American Indian

art, you will find River Trading

Post has a great mix of historic

and contemporary art from

over 50 tribal nations.

Come visit. Enjoy!

F

OUR

G

REAT

C

OLLECTOR

E

XPERIENCES

Dundee

RTP On-Line

Scottsdale

Santa Fe

A kiva and a Catholic church rest

Side-by-side at the ancient

Pecos Pueblo

Blackfeet woman's dance

dress decorated with German

beads of the time, ribbon and

shells. From the 1930's