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Phone: 866-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, IL 60118

K

ACHINAS

A

RRIVE

I

N

F

ORCE

T

O

H

ELP

G

ROWING

S

EASON

D

URING

B

EAN

D

ANCE

C

EREMONY

to help the beans grow.

The successful growth of the

beans in the warm kiva is a sign

for the success of the coming

harvest.

On the sixteenth day of the

ceremony, many Kachinas

dance and give bean sprouts

and gifts to the people.

Among the Kachinas at the

Bean Dance Ceremony are

Eototo and the Crow Mother.

Eototo is the chief of all Kachi-

nas, and is the spiritual counter-

part of the village chief. (He

belongs to the Bear Clan who

are the traditional village

chiefs.)

Each February, Kachinas re-

emerge from the sacred moun-

tain to the Hopi mesas where

they help prepare for the next

growing season. They also

initiate children into the

Kachina Society to prepare

them for growth as well.

The ceremony, called Powa-

muya, promotes fertility, germi-

nation, and early growth of

seeds. Planting of beans is a

central point of the ceremony.

Hence, the a portion of the

ceremony is referred to as the

Bean Dance Ceremony.

Deep within the kiva, beans are

planted in a bucket filled with

earth. A fire constantly burns

During the ceremony, the Crow

Mother appears at a shrine near

the village and begins to sing a

song that is her story of the

Kachina migration. She carries

with her a bowl of corn meal in

a basket. The Powamu chief

blesses her with a prayer

feather, and takes the corn from

her so that she can start the

long jouney to her home at the

base of San Francisco Peaks.

The Bean Dance is open to

guests at the Hopi Village, Ho-

tevilla. If you plan to attend, it

is best to check ahead to con-

firm dates.

Arts of Native America

Eototo, Chief of All

Kachinas

(Carving by Preston

Youvella)

Crow Mother Sings

of Kachina

Migration

(Carving by Wayne

Polaaha