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A

RBUCKLES

’ T

HE

C

OFFEE

T

HAT

W

ON

T

HE

W

EST

Trading Post Times

Page 2

Up until the close of the Civil

War, coffee was sold green. It

had to be roasted on a wood

stove or in a skillet over a

campfire before it could be

ground and brewed. One

burned bean ruined all; there

was no consistency. In 1865,

John Arbuckle and his brother

Charles, partners in a Pitts-

burgh grocery business,

changed all this by patenting a

process for roasting and coating

coffee beans with an egg and

sugar glaze to seal in the flavor

and aroma.

Marketed as

ARBUCKLES'

ARIOSA COFFEE

, in pat-

ented, airtight, one pound pack-

ages, the new coffee was an

instant success with chuck

wagon cooks in the west faced

with the task of keeping Cow-

boys supplied with plenty of hot

coffee out on the range.

Arbuckles' Ariosa (air-ee-o-sa)

Coffee

was shipped all over the

country in sturdy wooden

crates, one hundred packages to

a crate. The brew became so

dominant, particularly in the

west, that many Cowboys were

not aware there was any other

kind.

Each package of

ARBUCK-

LES'

contained a stick of pep-

permint candy. Due to the de-

mands on chuck wagon cooks

to keep a ready supply of hot

ARBUCKLES'

on hand

around the campfire, the pep-

permint stick became a means

by which the steady coffee sup-

ply was ground.

Upon hearing the cook's call,

"Who wants the candy?" some

of the toughest Cowboys on the

trail were known to vie for the

opportunity of manning the

coffee grinder in exchange for

satisfying a sweet tooth.

Gashweseoma, music of Hopi

group Blu Thunder, and a two

part series featuring Sioux eld-

ers entitled

Honor The Grand-

mothers

.

Since its launch, the

River Trad-

ing Post Pod Network

the series

has been syndicated by Digital

Podcast, Google Base, Yahoo

For tips, tidbits, information,

music and more, collectors of

Native American Art are sure

to enjoy the new

River Trading

Post Pod Network.

The new podcast series was

launched in April, 2006 with

nine feature episodes, that fea-

ture Hopi basket maker Darlene

Podcasts, Podcast Alley, and

others.

Over time, the series will grow

to include interviews and dis-

cussions with many of today’s

top Native American artists.

You can find us by “Googling”

River Trading Post Pod Net-

work

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

P

OD

N

ETWORK

D

EBUTS

Arbuckles’ Coffee is always on for guests of

River Trading Post. We’ve brewed

hundreds of pounds of the famous beverage

fabulous pieces stop collectors

in their tracks with their eclectic

yet traditional form.

Ramson has been busy creating

his new “Spirit Beings” at his

studio in Hotevilla, AZ. He

also is currently inspiring young

Hopi artisans in the medium of

glass through his summer class

sessions at Hopitutukaiki.

Ramson studied the medium of

glass at Pilchuck Glass Studio

in Washington State while fine

tuning his new art form as an

artist in residence with the

School of American Research

in Santa Fe, NM.

Ramson’s “Spirit Beings” are

available at River Trading Post

in, Chicagoland, Santa Fe and

Scottsdale.

Ramson Lomatewama (Hopi)

renowned kachina carver, poet

and jeweler has embraced a

new medium, glass.

His new “Spirit Beings” offer

the collector a new look at the

beauty of glass and swirling

colors of movement. The spirit

pieces are created to honor our

connection to the earth and the

flowing energy within. These

K

ACHINA

D

OLL

C

ARVER

L

OMATEWAMA

T

RYS

H

AND

A

T

G

LASS

Hopi carver Ramson Lomatewama shifts from

cottonwood root to glass in his new

“Spirit Being” creations

The Podcast symbol

shows where digital

feeds are available for

listing to and viewing

program content