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Trading Post Times

Page 2

Red Cloud and Sitting Bull,

and of Geronimo, the Chirica-

hua Apache leader.

Thus far, the museum has

raised over $750,000 for the

project, but the total cost isn’t

known.

Reproductions of the images in

the collection will be available

on-line. Visit

www.nmai.si.edu

years to complete the huge pro-

ject.

Plans for the project began

three years ago in order to pro-

vide a museum experience to

Native people, and others, who

never will have the opportunity

to visit the museum.

The start-up exhibit contains

the most requested items, in-

cluding pictures of Sioux chiefs

The National Museum of the

American Indian has a space

problem. It can display less

than 1 percent of its collection

of over 800,000 objects.

The solution? Put 800,000

items on line where everyone

can enjoy them.

The project will begin with just

5,500 items, and it is estimated

that it will take at least four

NMAI T

O

P

UT

M

ASSIVE

C

OLLECTION

O

NLINE

800,000 objects On

Line is the ambitious

goal of the National

Museum of the

American Indian

You don’t have to have a fat bank account to build a great collection of Native American Art.

Here are some tips on how to do that, and what we can do to help.

1.

Become Educated

. Visit as many galleries and art shows as you can to learn about artists, their

work and their cultures. We can help visitors to our galleries learn as we have over 51 different

tribal cultures represented in our collections. And, we provide collectors with some great insights

through our

Trading Post Times,

and in the

Tips and Tidbits

area of our website.

2.

Ask Questions

. Don’t be shy. Native American Art is a complex subject, and even the experts

don’t have all the answers. Probably the most important question is, “Is this authentic?” While

we certainly don’t pretend to have all of the answers, feel free to ask us, or e-mail us. If we aren’t

ready with an answer to your question, we’ll certainly find the answer for you.

3.

Shop for value

. Begin by working with a reputable resource, like River Trading Post, that sub-

scribes to the rigid standards of the Indian Arts and Crafts Association (IACA), and the Antique

Tribal Dealers Association (ATADA). Don’t be tricked by equating “deals” and “discounts” with

value. But do take advantage of special gallery offerings such as those included in our

RIVER TRADING POST SELECT

collections. These items are clearly tagged in each of our

galleries, and are featured each month in a special mailing to subscribers to our online

Trading Post Times

. You also can look at the

Great Finds

page on our website to find special items

to help kick off a new collection.

4.

Stretch Your Budget.

Set a budget for yourself, then look for ways to stretch it to help your cash

flow. We help collectors do that through our

Collector’s Layaway Program

. Many of our collectors

take advantage of this interest free program to acquire that special piece that “Speaks to them.” If

you budget a little each month, you can build a nice collection in five to 10 years. (Even a tiny

bathroom can be made into a personally curated exhibit.)

5.

Look for emerging artists.

Even today’s masters started somewhere in time, and over time their

works have appreciated in value. Many of today’s young artists will become tomorrow’s masters.

We work each day with many new artists who show the spark to become tomorrow’s masters.

Acquiring works by new artists not only can represent a great buying opportunity, but your art

acquisition also helps to support the Native American artists and their families.

6.

Pick a starting point.

Diversity is one of the beauties of Native American Art. Some folks like to

focus on a single area, such as Pueblo Pottery. Others prefer a highly diverse collection that in-

cludes representative works of Plains, Navajo, Hopi, Pueblo and many other cultures. A visit with

us personally, or to our website, can help to spark a plan for you.

Allotting little bit

each month can

result in a nice

collection in five to

ten years.

River Trading Post Select items

represent great buying opportunities.

This collection is on display throughout

our galleries, and to folks subscribing

to the online edition of

Trading Post Times

.