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Native American Language,

Culture and History on the

Menominee Reservation.

As a child, she learned the

loom style of beadwork from

her mother, and made a hobby

of it. She would make small

gifts for her family and friends.

Over time, she learned complex

beading techniques from watch-

ing others.

Wendy says her inspiration

comes from anywhere, and

everywhere, the past, present

and future. She tells us that she

uses materials that are available

to her, including soft brain-

tanned buckskin, porcupine

quills, glass beads and cones.

You can see Wendy’s work at

River Trading Post, Santa Fe

and on our website.

Menominee artist Wendy

Boivin joins an exclusive group

of featured artists at River Trad-

ing Post.

Wendy grew up on the Me-

nominee Reservation in Wis-

consin, attended the Institute of

American Indian Arts in Santa

Fe, and earned her B.S. in Edu-

cation from the University of

Wisconsin-Madison.

For many years, Wendy taught

M

ENOMINEE

A

RTI ST

W

ENDY

B

OIVIN

J

OINS

RTP

Volume 6, Issue 3

Page 3

The original Cliff Palace

(above); and Gordon Tonip’s

Cliff Palace sculpture (below).

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: C

LIFF

P

ALACE

Nestled in a cavern, high above

the canyon floor, is majestic

Cliff Palace, the largest cliff

dwelling in North America.

Located at Mesa Verde in the

southwest corner of Colorado,

the ancestral Pueblo people

called this home from AD 1190

through 1260.

The massive dwelling contains

23 kivas, and is an exceptional

example of the fabulous archi-

tecture developed by the an-

cient people.

Tree ring dating indicates that

the majority of the place was

constructed over a 20 year pe-

riod, and probably contained

two distinct communities.

Just imagine the people at work

and the children at play at Cliff

Palace.

These people had a distinct

artistic style expressed through

their architecture, pottery and

the many petroglyphs found

throughout the region.

By 1300 AD, Cliff Place be-

came a ghost town, having been

totally abandoned.

While the reasons for the peo-

ple leaving are not totally clear,

some believe that huge

droughts during the period

forced to people to relocate.

Many of today’s modern

Pueblo people are descendants

of this great culture.

Cherokee artist, Gordon Tonips

capture the feel of Cliff Palace

in his award winning sculpture

Tonip’s

Cliff Palace

is on display

at River Trading Post in Scotts-

dale.

Mesa Verde. One of our favor-

ites.

F

OUR

G

REAT

C

OLLECTOR

E

XPERIENCES

River Trading Post

314 N. River Street

Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

610 B. Canyon Road

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

505-982-2805

7033 E. Main Street

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

www.rivertradingpost.com

Whether you are decorating

your home or are an avid col-

lector of fine American Indian

art, you will find River Trading

Post has a great mix of historic

and contemporary art from

over 50 tribal nations.

Come visit. Enjoy!

Dundee

RTP On-Line

Scottsdale

Santa Fe