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Fine Native American art is

welcomed into the lives of any-

one fortunate enough to receive

such an item, for many reasons.

But the selection of a work of

Native American art is appreci-

ated most of all by the artists

themselves at the Holiday Sea-

son since it gives them the op-

portunity to better provide for

themselves and for their fami-

lies.

Each year, a very significant

portion of our River Trading

Post revenue goes directly to

our Native American artist

family, and toward the educa-

tion of Native American people

through the American Indian

College Fund.

During this Holiday Season,

consider Native American art

for everyone on your gift list.

Selecting a work of Native

American Art for the holidays

is like selecting a gift that keeps

on giving.

Whether it is a fine Navajo

weaving, a wonderful piece of

Pueblo pottery, a magnificent

work of sculpture, or a spec-

tacular piece of Native Ameri-

can Jewelry, your gift will mean

a great deal to a great many

people.

A G

IFT

F

OR

L

OVED

O

NES

A

ND

F

OR

I

NDAIN

A

RTI STS

: A H

OLDAY

T

HOUGHT

F

OR

Y

OU

Volume 6, Issue 4

Page 3

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: R

UINS

A

T

S

ANTA

C

LARA

P

UEBLO

The spectacular Puye Ruins are

located on the reservation of

Santa Clara Pueblo. The old

mesa-top village sits on the

Parjaito Plateau, and is consid-

ered the ancestral home of

Santa Clara and other Tewa-

speaking pueblos.

The 740-room ruin was occu-

pied around 1250 to 1550 AD

with many of the structures

growing to three or more sto-

ries. It was a vibrant commu-

nity and home to nearly 1500

people back then. There is an

ancient kiva as well as a tradi-

tional ball court found in the

center of the living quarters

which indicates there was a

thriving, rich religious culture.

Many of the structures are be-

low the mesa-top village and

are literally carved out of a 200

foot high cliff where the rock is

relatively soft.

The cliff face is covered with

pictographs, many of which

were of great importance as

they helped the people track the

sun’s position in the sky. This

way they knew when it was

time to plant or harvest their

crops, which were located in

the fertile valley below. (We

noticed a few pictographs that

were clearly made after Spanish

contact.)

In 2000, a massive wildfire

burned much of Santa Clara

Canyon and forced the closure

of Puye. Just recently, the ruins

were opened again to the pub-

lic, and guided visits are permit-

ted. The guides are from Santa

Clara Pueblo, and really pro-

vide great insights into the place

and the culture – both ancient

and current day.

The trek up to the cliff ruins

might make some people huff

and puff, but is well worth the

visit if you are able. The mesa-

top is fascinating as well, and is

an easy tour as a little van will

take you to the top.

“A gift of Native American Art

is a gift well received,

especially by the artists

themselves.”

F

OUR

G

REAT

C

OLLECTOR

E

XPERIENCES

River Trading Post

314 N. River Street

Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

610 B. Canyon Road

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

505-982-2805

7033 E. Main Street, #102

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

Whether you are decorating

your home or are an avid col-

lector of fine American Indian

art, you will find River Trading

Post has a great mix of historic

and contemporary art from

over 50 tribal nations.

Come visit. Enjoy!

Happy Holidays

Dundee

RTP On-Line

Scottsdale

Santa Fe

Puye Ruins: on a mesa and in a cliff