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R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

S

COTTSDALE

T

EAMS

W

ITH

H

I STORIC

T

OADLENA

T

RADING

P

OST

Trading Post Times

Page 2

Back in 1897, a trader named

Joe Wilkin opened a wagon

post near a small spring in Na-

vajo Country. It was called

Tohalii,

which means

water bub-

bling up.

By 1900,

Tohalii

was twisted to

Toadlena

by Anglos in the area.

The old place had a small store,

and Navajo people soon made

the place a center of activity,

including trading weavings for

goods.

Over the years, subsequent

traders at the old post, includ-

ing George Bloomfield and Ed

Davies worked with the weav-

ers of the area to develop the

Two Grey Hills weaving style.

A style known for high quality

textile that used the weavers’

preferences for hand spun yarns

in natural colors. (A major con-

trast to the popular commercial

dyed reds of the Ganado rugs.)

In 1997, trader Mark Winter

assumed the old trading post,

where the historic Two Grey

Hills weaving tradition has

been passed from grandmother,

to mother, to daughter.

Today, the old Toadlena Trad-

ing post houses the

Toadlena

Weaving Museum

, a virtual

shrine to the world’s finest

Navajo weavers.

Now, Over 100 years after the

original trading post opened,

River Trading Post has teamed

Toadlena to make these weav-

original designer fashions and

unique homes, and renowned

galleries. All of this fun and

food helps young people de-

velop the skills needed to crea-

tively respond to life.

Visitors to River Trading Post

during this classic event will

meet many of today’s top Na-

tive American artists, and will

A great time for a creative

cause, now in its 13th season,

ARTfeast is heralded as one of

the most inspired reasons for a

getaway.

The weekend of festivities, Feb-

ruary 26 through February 28,

celebrates Santa Fe’s world-

class chefs and restaurants, an

international array of vintners,

especially enjoy the awesome

barbeque provided by Josh’s

BBQ, the first place winner of

the

Best In Santa Fe

.

Tickets to the event are just

$35.00.

Visit

www.artfeast.com

for

more information about this

Santa Fe Classic. We’ll see you

there.

E

ATS

G

ALORE

A

T

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

S

ANTA

F

E

A Canyon Road Favorite. River

Trading Post—Santa Fe. A bit of

quiet, great art, a lot of un. And

Josh’s BBQ during Santa Fe’s

Edible Art Tour.

piece of art.

To our way of thinking, the real

value of a great piece of Native

American Art (or any other art

for that matter) is the

“Enjoyment Dividend.”

The “Enjoyment Dividend”

pays out each and every day,

year in and year out, as it

warms your home as well as

your heart.

Because each work of art is a

personal thing, the value of the

art, either for love or for

money, varies considerably by

individual. So, it really isn’t

possible to assess the future

value of an object, because the

ultimate value is what is in the

heart and not in the pocket-

book.

Many times over the course of a

year, we have visitors carefully

comparing several pieces of fine

pottery, Navajo weavings or

other item. And, they fre-

quently will ask us which piece

is most likely to increase in

value over time.

While we believe that is a legiti-

mate question, the truth is that

it is almost impossible to tell the

future dollar value of any given

C

OLLECTING

N

ATIVE

A

MERICAN

A

RT

F

OR

L

OVE

O

R

F

OR

M

ONEY

“The real value in an

art investment is the

‘Enjoyment Dividend’

that your art will pay

out every day.”

ings available more broadly to

collectors everywhere, through

our River Trading Post web-

site, and in a very special area

of our River Trading Post,

Scottsdale gallery.

Our partnership with historic

Toadlena helps to contribute

to the livelihood of over 120 of

the finest weavers in the world

today.

Historic Toadlena is a major Navajo

gathering and social place.

Weaver Margaret Yazzie continues

the Toadlena weaving tradition.

Mother Earth, Father Sky. By

Mary H. Yazzie.