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P

RIDE

O

F

T

HE

O

J IBWE

: T

HE

B

ANDOLIER

B

AG

Trading Post Times

Page 2

Long before Europeans came to

North America, Anishinabe

(Ojibwe) women designed

necklaces using beads made

from wood, shells or other ma-

terials. The Ojibwe word for

beads,

manidoominensag

, means

“berries of the Creator.”

On clothing, women made

designs by sewing dyed porcu-

pine quills. During the 17th

century, European glass beads

gradually replaced quillwork.

One beaded item was fashioned

after the type of pouch carried

by British soldiers. This shoul-

der-strap pouch was called a

bandolier bag.

Woodland Indian men wore

bandolier bags as objects of

prestige, and sometimes they

wore more than one at a time.

This kind of bag became so

valuable that the Woodlands

people would trade one bag to

the neighboring Dakota people

for a pony.

An exceptional example of this

prized work is displayed at

River Trading Post in East

Dundee, Il.

as an Indian trader was “ to

look after the material welfare

of his neighbors; to advise them

to produce that which their

natural inclinations and talent

best adapts them; to treat them

honestly and to insist upon

getting the same treatment from

them...to find a market for their

products and vigilantly watch

that they keep improving in the

production of same, and advise

them which commands the best

price.”

The Hubbell Trading Post

stands proudly today as a living

monument to times not so far

past.

Hubbell died on November 12,

1930 and is buried on Hubbell

Hill overlooking his historic

trading post.

Reservation trading posts were

often the only direct point of

contact between Native and

non-Native Americans until

well into the 20th century.

John Lorenzo Hubbell (

Naakaii

Sani

) began trading outside of

Ganado in 1876, as the Navajo

people adjusted from the brutal

“long walk” of 1864.

Hubbell said that his first duty

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: H

UBBELL

T

RADING

P

OST

River Trading Post

7140 East 1st Avenue

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

Whether you are decorating

your home, or are an avid col-

lector of fine American Indian

art, you will find River Trading

Post has a great mix of historic

and contemporary art from

over 50 tribal nations.

Come visit. Enjoy!

T

WO

G

REAT

C

OLLECTOR

E

XPERIENCES

Hubbell Trading Post,

Ganado, Arizona

This turn of the century bando-

lier bag, pictured at the left,

measures 43 by 15 inches and

features the traditional flower

design beaded onto black vel-

vet. The complex beadwork

includes beads of silver, orange,

black, green and various shades

of blue.

Additional information about

this stunning piece can be

found on the River Trading

Post website, or by visiting our

East Dundee gallery.