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R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

A

RTI ST

S

HOWCASE

H

EADS

T

O

S

ANTA

F

E

Trading Post Times

Page 2

Throughout the summer, visi-

tors to River Trading Post in

Santa Fe will have the opportu-

nity to meet with and visit

many “working artists” as they

are featured in our

River Trading

Post Artist Showcase.

Our

River Trading Post Artist

Showcase

program provides us

with the opportunity to say

“Thank You” to our many Na-

tive American artist friends by

giving them the opportunity to

create and sell their work di-

rectly to our visitors and collec-

tors.

All of the proceeds from this

program go directly to the River

Trading Post Showcase artists.

When you visit River Trading

Post in Santa Fe, you will find

artists that create pottery, bead-

work and even cowboy hats

and hatbands.

Our 2010 lineup includes Car-

los Laate (Zuni potter), Melissa

Lewis-Barnes (Navajo and crea-

tor of awesome cowboy hats),

Wendy Boivin (Menominee

beadwork), and many others.

Be sure to drop by and visit

with us in our old adobe house

on Canyon Road in Santa Fe.

See schedule on our website.

and prices for the real thing are

soaring.

Why? The coral reefs are one of

the most endangered ecosys-

tems on Earth today, threat-

ened by warming ocean waters,

pollution, and a host of other

reasons.

United States law requires spe-

cial permits for the importation

The skeletons of a tiny sea crea-

ture have been used in jewelry

decoration for thousands of

years. We know them as coral,

an organic gemstone used

widely by Native American

artisans in the creation of beau-

tiful jewelry

Today, true coral jewelry is

becoming very difficult to find,

of coral, and certain species

may not be used for commer-

cial purposes (including jewelry

decorations.)

To compensate for the short-

age, artists frequently turn to

spiny oyster or more abundant

white coral that has been dyed.

The age of great coral jewelry is

coming to a close.

W

HERE

D

ID

A

LL

T

HE

C

ORAL

G

O

?

(October 1906 - Summer 1909)

until his death in 1960.

After the split between the

Friendlies and the Hostiles at

Oraibi in 1906, Tawaquaptewa

began to produce Kachina fig-

ures, rattles, tabletas, dance

wands, and other traditional

Hopi items.

As a chief and religious leader

he was unique in his efforts to

not sell his culture's artifacts.

He invented kachinas which

combined attributes from tradi-

tional kachinas, as well as ele-

ments of his own imagination

.

Today, Ryon Polequaptewa has

undertaken the project of creat-

ing dolls in the Tawaquaptewa

tradition.

Polequaptewa is one of today’s

most respected Hopi carvers.

His work is featured in our gal-

leries, and on our website.

You can enjoy interviews with,

and music by Ryon Polequap-

tewa on the River Trading Post

Pod Network.

Wilson Tawaquaptewa was

born of the Bear Clan in the

Hopi village of Oraibi, Third

Mesa, Arizona, in 1873.

Oraibi was the largest and most

important Hopi village at the

time of Tawaquaptewa's birth.

The Bear Clan was among the

most significant clans at Hopi.

In 1904, Tawaquaptewa be-

came the village chief or

Kik-

mongwi

, and remained in this

position despite health issues

and political imprisonment

R

YON

P

OLEQUAPTEWA

R

ESURRECTS

S

TYLE

OF

W

ILSON

T

AWAQUAPTEWA

Carlos Laate (Zuni) and Anita Suazo

(Santa Clara) will be among featured

artists during our

2010 Artist Showcase

at River Trading Post, Santa Fe

Unnamed carving by Ryon Polequaptewa in

the Wilson Tawaquaptewa Style.

Melissa Lewis-Barnes, Navajo, brings

her cowboy hats to the River Trading Post

Artist Showcase in Santa Fe

Beautiful, old coral jewelry is on the

Endangered Species List.