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Phone: 866-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, IL 60118

T

HE

A

NCIENT

S

PIRITUAL

S

ANCTUARY

OF

THE

P

UEBLO

P

EOPLE

kiva from the top using a lad-

der.

Pueblo people come out of the

kivas (like being born) for cere-

monies and dances.

Frequently walls are decorated

and altars hold fetishes that

represent animals and deities.

From the time of Spanish arri-

val until the 1930’s, kiva cere-

monies and religious ceremo-

nies were suppressed and many

kivas were violated.

Since the 1930’s the Pueblo

people once again could openly

practice their ancient ceremo-

nies, and do so to this day.

Since before history was re-

corded, the kiva was the heart

of sacred rituals and ceremonies

for the Pueblo people.

It served then, and today, as the

place where the spiritual and

the physical come together.

According to Pueblo beliefs, the

spiritual beings of the world

below instructed the people of

this world to construct the kiva

as a

sipapu,

the place from

which humans emerged into

this world from their previous

existence.

Traditionally the kiva was built

into the ground in order to

bring the two worlds together,

and people descend into the

Arts of Native America

Images:

Left top: A kiva ladder ascends from

the underground into the present world.

Left Bottom: Reconstruction of the

Great Kiva, Aztec Ruins. Aztec, CO.

Above: Kiva wall painting at Kuana

Ruins. Bernalillo, NM.