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Phone: 866-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, IL 60118

W

HAT

DOES

T

HE

S

TORM

P

ATTERN

W

EAVING

R

EPRESENT

?

The lightning lines radiating

from the center to the four cor-

ners represent a connection

between the weaver and the

four sacred mountains of the

Diné. The mountains are the

termination points of each light-

ning line. The borders depict

rainfall. Other design elements

represent water bugs and centi-

pedes. So they say.

One Navajo friend tells us that

the pattern depicts Spider

Woman giving the Navajo the

gift of weaving.

Cultural anthropologist Ann

Hedlund believes that all of

these interpretations are “Great

White Trader Stories.”

The Storm Pattern is one of the

most popular of all Navajo

weavings, and people fre-

quently ask us what the design

represents.

Truth is, there are varying opin-

ions about the symbolism in the

design.

Some say it is highly symbolic

and is associated with the very

important, water giving, rain-

storms that help growth. They

say that the design portrays the

storm as a sacred occurrence.

Many suggest that the very

center symbolizes a Navajo

Hogan, or the center of the

universe from which the People

emerged.

Most Navajo weaving scholars

agree that the Storm Pattern

design was heavily influenced

by the white traders, including

J.B. Moore, although it gener-

ally is associated with the Tuba

Trading Post on the western

edge of the Navajo reservation.

One thing is certain. There is a

lot of discussion, and there are

quite a few opinions about the

meanings contained within the

famed design.

Over the years, the Storm Pat-

tern has emerged as one of the

most popular of all Navajo

weavings. It is woven in a vari-

ety of colors by weavers

throughout Navajo land.

Arts of Native America

What Mysteries Are Contained In

The Navajo Storm Pattern?