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Trading Post Times

Volume 10, Issue 4

October:December 2013

SPECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST:

13th Anniversary Celebration,

Friday, November 9

11 am to 9 pm

River Trading Post

Dundee, Scottsdale, Website

Pueblo Seasonal Dances. Please check

Pueblos for dates and times

R i v e r T r a d i n g P o s t

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Great Gift Ideas For The

Season

2

Favorite Places:

Kasha-Katuwe

4

On Friday, November 8, River

Trading Post will celebrate our

13th birthday in our galleries

and on our website.

Be certain to mark your calen-

dars, and join us in Dundee,

Scottsdale or on our River

Trading Post website to enjoy

special Birthday Values on any

of your purchases.

It is our way of saying “Thank

You” for your great support

over 13 wonderful years.

R

IVER

T

RADING

P

OST

C

ELEBRATES

13 G

REAT

Y

EARS

. T

HANK

Y

OU

!

A few weeks as we visited the

White Mountain Apache mu-

seum in Fort Apache, Arizona.

The museum displayed a great

number of wonderful old Apache

baskets, all of which were on

loan to the museum from several

collectors. A note in the exhibit

told us that Apache people are

no longer making baskets, and

the elders who knew how to

make them are now gone. (See

related story in the July 2013

Trading Post Times.

)

A few years back, we visited the

Blackfeet Cultural Center in

Browning, Montana. There, we

purchased two beautiful exam-

ples of contemporary quillwork.

Later, we discovered that these

beautiful pipe bags were actually

made by a Czech artist who was

teaching quillwork to members

of the Blackfeet nation. Virtually

no quillwork is being created

anymore by American Indians.

The same holds true with

beadwork. The days of bead-rich

bandolier bags, moccasins, to-

bacco bags and saddles are gone

for good. At best, beads today

are used as accents, frequently

using cheap craft beads. Great

contemporary beadwork, using

high-quality materials, is only

being done by a handful of artists

such as JT Willie, IACA’s 2013

Artist of the Year.

Yet there are spots of vibrancy in

American Indian art today, par-

ticularly in pottery, jewelry mak-

ing, weaving, sculpture, and the

resurgence of the neo-traditional

Hopi kachina doll. In these ar-

eas, traditional and contempo-

rary art is still being produced by

people continuing the work of

generations before them. Many

of these artists are still able to

support themselves and their

families while honoring their

cultural artistic heritage.

Unfortunately, as with other art

disciplines, there is a wider and

wider gap between those great

artists and others who are being

forced to find other lines of work

in today’s economy.

We don’t think that American

Indian art in general is an endan-

gered species, but many forms of

that art are being lost. Soon,

antiques will be all we have left.

Sadly, some art forms are gone

forever. Happily other art forms

will be with us for years to come.