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over 31,000 Native American

residents in Chicago.

In February, the center will

open a new museum and art

gallery in suburban Schaum-

burg with

50 Years of Powwow

being its first exhibit.

The exhibit shows the history of

the AIC’s powwows through

photography.

One goal of the museum is to

show people that there are hun-

dreds of different tribes and

hundreds of different traditions

in Native American cultures.

The new facility also will pro-

vide space to local Native

American artists where they

can practice and display their

crafts.

In 1953, when the U.S. govern-

ment was stripping tribes of

their “official” status, a small

group of American Indians held

a powwow sponsored by the

American Indian Center of

Chicago which had just

opened.

Today, the American Indian

Center of Chicago is the largest

such urban institution serving

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

C

ENTER

O

F

C

HICAGO

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PEN

M

USEUM

Volume 2, Issue 1

Page 3

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: G

ILA

C

LIFFS

High in the hills north of Silver

City, New Mexico is a place

where families dwelled from

about 1280 through the early

1300’s.

These Native American people

probably farmed in the fields

next to the Gila River. They

grew corn, beans and squash.

They also hunted wildlife of the

area including mule and white-

tail deer.

A part of the Mogollon culture,

the people used the large natu-

ral caves to build their dwell-

ings of natural materials.

These people also were highly

skilled at weaving and pottery-

making. They used yucca

plants to provide material for

sandals and other clothing.

The large, beautiful dwelling

contained forty rooms, and

perhaps was occupied by 10 to

15 families.

Scholars suspect that the dwell-

ings were occupied for not

much more than twenty years.

It is unknown why the cliff

dwelling was abandoned.

Today, the Gila Cliff Dwellings

are preserved as a National

Monument. The surroundings

look today very much like they

did when the cliff dwellings

were inhabited.

This is one of our favorite

places because it is easily acces-

sible, and is not overrun by

tourists. It is a great place to

learn about the beauty of our

ancient civilizations.

Dwelling at Gila Cliff

Two Grey Hills Weaving by

Mary Ann Damon

handspun wool into very com-

plex patterns. The subtle

shades of the basic hues are the

result of carding together wool

from different sheep.

The wool usually is handspun,

requiring considerable time and

effort. A Two Grey Hills weav-

ing may cost twice as much as

Of all Navajo weavings, those

from the Two Grey Hills region

are most consistently the finest

to be found anywhere.

The TGH weavings have been

called the “Mercedes Benz” of

Navajo weavings.

True Two Grey Hills rugs are

woven of natural, undyed,

others of comparable size, but

the weavings are spectacular.

When you visit our galleries, or

our website, you will find a nice

selection of Two Grey Hills

weavings in just about every

size.

T

WO

G

REY

H

ILLS

— T

HE

B

ENZ

O

F

W

EAVINGS

Flag Bearers—AIC Powwow

PhotocourtesyAIC:WarrenPerlstein