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Volume 13, Issue 4

Page 3

River Trading Post

314 N. River Street

Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

7033 E. Main Street, 102

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

www.rivertradingpost.com

For over 16 years now,

River Trading Post has become

renowned for its diverse collection

of American Indian art, and as the

friendliest place around for explor-

ing and buying American Indian

art.

Browse our galleries, visit our web-

site, and we believe you will find a

treasure with your name on it.

B

RINGING

Y

OU

T

HE

F

INEST

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

A

RT

F

OR

16 Y

EARS

.

Scottsdale

Dundee

A

N

A

MERICAN

I

NDIAN

A

RT

D

ILEMA

(continued from page 2)

As Tribal Nations grapple with the question of enrollment, art-related organizations such as the IACA or even gallery owners may find

that today’s Anglo artist may be tomorrow’s American Indian artist. While the dilemma of American Indian identification has been de-

fined legally, and we respect the ability of each sovereign nation to determine their own enrollment requirements, we wonder just how

diluted a person’s bloodline must be before they are unable to claim to be an American Indian, or an American Indian artist.

T

HE

S

TATE OF

O

KLAHOMA

B

ANS

S

TATE

R

ECOGNIZED

T

RIBAL

A

RTISTS

The state of Oklahoma has recently enacted a law that recognizes only members of a federally recognized tribe as Native, and thus mem-

bers of state –only recognized tribes may not sell their work in the state of Oklahoma labeled or represented as authentic American Indian

art. The Cherokee Nation fully supports this recent law and was instrumental in getting it passed. At the same time, the Cherokee Na-

tion has no minimum blood quantum requirement for it’s tribal members. Rather, it requires a family history that can be traced back to

the Dawes act of 1887. One must simply have had an ancestor whose name is on the Dawes Rolls of displaced American Indians who

accepted Oklahoma land allotments from the federal government. If that connection can be made, a person can be officially, and legally,

a Cherokee.

A W

ONDERFUL

L

ETTER

FROM

AN

O

LD

F

RIEND

We love hearing from our friends, and occasionally

we like to share special notes to us with you.

Our October issue featured our great new collec-

tion of Fred Harvey Railroad jewelry which stirred

some memories for an old friend. This is her story

that we would like to share.

“Thank you for the latest “super issue” of the Times. I had

a roommate back in the 50’s and we were trying to eat at

every Fred Harvey’s between St. Louis and California. We

lived in Wichita and the first stop was Newton, KS. The

menu listed all Fred Harvey’s and we mapped out our trips

to include – Gallup, Albuquerque, etc. I opened the Times

and saw in the picture of the bracelets [fourth from the left]

the one I bought at age 10 in Colorado Springs [with my

own money] in 1939. That IS my bracelet including the

stamping and the scalloped base for the stone. I also have 3

tiny bugs [40’s] which I love. Thank you for all you are

doing to promote the American Indian culture and the new/

old information you share.”

N.D., Charleston, SC