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Many folks turn to various on-

line auctions when searching

for American Indian jewelry.

Recently, we have received

more and more concerns from

both consumers and legitimate

American Indian jewelry deal-

ers that many of these on-line

auction sites and their associat-

ed “stores” are featuring cheap

imported jewelry. They are

falsely representing it as Ameri-

can Indian made.

If you scour on-line auctions for

your treasure, be certain that

you actually receive what you

believe you are buying.

Many of the fakes look like the

real deal, but they are not. If

you see what you believe to be

a great bargain, verify that the

piece that strikes you is actually

what it purports to be.

Best advice:

Buy from a reputable

dealer.

For more information see:

www.doi.gov/iacb

O

UR

L

OVE

FOR

THE

O

LD

, T

HE

U

NUSUAL

Trading Post Times

O

N

-

LINE

A

UCTION

B

UYERS

B

EWARE

We always have had a passion

for the beautiful work created

long ago. Both work that in its

day was not considered an art

form, but strictly utilitarian,

and the later pieces which were

heavily adorned.

While we review hundreds of

pieces each year, we select just

a very few that especially strike

us because they are very unusu-

al—and most importantly, af-

fordable—to most of today’s

collectors.

Two of our most recent addi-

tions are shown here, just to

give you an idea.

At the top right is a Plateau

baby yoke that dates back to

1900. This piece is made of

white, red, blue, and green glass

trade beads sewn onto hide.

The piece is very rare, and we

just couldn’t pass it up.

At the bottom right is a combi-

nation of things. The first is a

flat-topped powder horn da-

ting back to 1780—1830, that

was likely traded to an Ameri-

can Indian for other goods.

The second is Athabaskan strap

for the powder horn that was

added somewhere between

1870 and 1890. The strap is

beautifully beaded on old red

trade cloth and the combination

is stunning.

These historic pieces would

certainly take prizes at today’s

top Indian markets.

You can see more about them

in our Scottsdale gallery or on

our website.

Volume 14, Issue 2

April:June 2017

R i v e r T r a d i n g P o s t

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

River Trading Post

Artists Win Big

2

Favorite Places: The

Range Cafe

3

Honest People and a

Head-Slapper

3

An Apache Feast at

River Trading Post

4

SPECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST:

·

Gathering of Nations Powwow

April 27—29, Albuquerque, NM

·

IACA Artist of the Year Celebra-

tion, April 7, Isleta Resort and

Casino, Isleta Pueblo NM

·

Eitlejorg Indian Market

June 23—25, Indianapolis, IN