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Phone: 866-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, IL 60118

Arts of Native America

F

ANNIE

S

M

IGRATION

P

ATTERN

L

ASTS

THROUGH

G

ENERATIONS

by a healthcare worker or mis-

sionary.

Fannie completed third grade at

the Polacca Day School and

then was transferred to the In-

dian Boarding School. Under

horrible conditions, Fannie

endured the boarding school

until her parents pulled her out

and she became a maid at the

Hubbell Trading Post.

After being married to Vinton

Polacca, Fannie became more

involved in making pottery.

Fannie Nampeyo, daughter of

Nampeyo of Hano, was cred-

ited with the popularization of

the migration pattern, the most

recognized design on Hopi

pottery today. This design sym-

bolizes the movement of the

Hopi people throughout his-

tory. Passed down through

Fannie’s descendents, it is now

synonymous with the famed

Nampeyo name.

Fannie’s life began around 1904

as “Popongua-Mana” (Picking

Pinons). Later, her name was

changed to Fannie, presumably

Working with her mother, she

often painted Nampeyo’s per-

fectly formed pots. As she ma-

tured, she developed a style of

her own with meticulous con-

struction and design. This is

evident in all of her pottery,

especially her fine-line migra-

tion pattern pieces.

Several excellent examples of

Fannie’s pottery are available at

Pueblo Arts in Scottsdale,

www.puebloarts.com

and at

River Trading Post,

www.rivertradingpost.com

.

Fannie Nampeyo

1904—1987

Fine Line Jar by

Fannie Nampeyo