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in museums throughout our

country, incorporated into the

finest home décor, and treas-

ured as highly desirable collect-

ables.

Sadly, business is flourishing

for people that sell “Indian Art”

to unsuspecting buyers that is

out and out fake. The problem

is especially true with fake

“Indian” jewelry imported from

overseas.

Worse, unscrupulous dealers

mark up items beyond market

value, artificially discount

them, and the buyer still over-

pays.

Federal and state laws prohibit

both of these practices, yet buy-

ers are stung every day as they

shop “Indian stores”.

Be careful. Work with a knowl-

edgeable gallery that you can

trust. You will rest assured.

Navajo weavers are the world’s

finest. Hopi Kachina carvers

preserve an age old tradition

with dignity and respect. Zuni

Fetish carvers share the essence

of animal spirits with us. And

the Pueblo People work the

blessed clay into the excep-

tional pottery that we all can

enjoy.

The fine arts and crafts of Na-

tive American people are seen

C

AVAET

E

MPTOR

(B

UYER

B

EWARE

)

Volume 3, Issue 1

Page 3

Palatki or “Red House”

from kindergartens in Connecti-

cut to universities in California.

The site is devoted to the

people, places and land of

Native America. You will find

great photography, videos, po-

etry and more as you visit the

site, as well as links to the most

interesting Native American

Native American Images

is a web-

site especially for people inter-

ested in historic and contempo-

rary photography of Native

America.

The site was created by the

folks at River Trading Post, and

is used extensively as a resource

for Native American studies

websites that we can find.

Over 15 million people have ac-

cessed

Native American Images

and

we thought you might enjoy ex-

ploring it also. Find us at

www.nativeamericanimages.org

N

ATIVE

A

MERICAN

I

MAGES

-A

N

RTP W

EBSITE

W

ORTH

C

HECKING

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: P

ALATKI

The foliage here is thick and

rich, deep green. You follow

the trail, as people have for the

past 6000 years, cross a small

stream and encounter a brilliant

red cliff.

Suddenly, you are awestruck by

a structure tucked into an al-

cove high in the cliff. You do a

double take to make sure that

you are seeing things correctly.

The Hopi call it

Palatki

(red

house), a place constructed by

the Southern Sinagua people

who inhabited this Arizona

area from about 650 A.D. to

around 1300 A.D. (Sinagua

means “without water.”) Ex-

perts believe that from 30 to 50

people occupied the place.

And, as if the dwelling isn’t

enough, the cliff walls on either

side of the dwelling make a

veritable gallery of ancient art.

The people used pigments of

kaolin clay for the white, and

pulverized hematite for red

tones, powdered limonite for

the yellows and charcoal for

black. Blood or fruit juice

made binders.

Using this palate, the gallery

was created. Images of the

people themselves, the animals

of the area and abstract symbols

literally cover the walls. It is a

magnificent display, sheltered

through the ages by the over-

hanging red rock.

Many of the images were pro-

duced from as long ago as

3000-6000 years, according to

the experts.

This favorite place of ours is at

Loy Butte, just outside of Se-

dona, Arizona. It simply is

awesome.

Buying Native American art can

be a pleasure, or fraught with

fraud. Buy from someone that

you trust.

Ancient Rock Art At Palatki

Native American Images

presents over 2,500 images and

videos of Native America