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designs.

Interestingly enough (or oddly

enough) this gallery of ancient

art is largely compacted along a

short, but rugged half-mile trail.

The Three Rivers Petroglyph

site is one of the largest, best

preserved sites in the South-

west.

If you travel to the area, be sure

to pack a picnic and take your

camera. You will enjoy the

picnic area at the site, and you

also will be able to take a walk

leading to a partially excavated

prehistoric village.

That is why the Three Rivers

Petroglyph site is one of our

favorite places.

South of Carrizozo, New Mex-

ico is a place called Three Riv-

ers.

The basaltic ridge juts high

above the valley below. That

ridge contains a kaleidoscope of

images carved into the stone

from ages past. There are

21,000 images that include

masks, sunbursts, handprints,

wildlife and various geometric

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: 21 , 000 S

TORIES

A

T

T

HREE

R

IVERS

Volume 3, Issue 2

Page 3

T

RADITION

E

VOLVES

I

NTO

B

EAUTY

Since prehistoric times, the

Zuni people have been accom-

plished workers of iron , copper

and shell. They were excep-

tional lapidaries.

One day, back in 1872 or so, a

man named Atsidi Chon (Ugly

Smith), the first Navajo silver-

smith, met up with his old Zuni

friend Lanyade. Chon intro-

duced the Zuni to silver. It is

said that Lanyade paid Chon

one good horse to teach him

the art of working with silver.

Early Zuni silverwork reflected

a Navajo likeness in its design.

But over the years, Zuni stu-

dents of the art developed their

own style of silver craftsman-

ship.

Because smaller pieces of tur-

quoise, coral and other stones

were easier to get, the Zuni

artisans developed an inlay

technique that would showcase

the small stones. Many small

stones are individually cut and

placed flush with the silver to

create beautiful designs.

Other techniques developed by

the Zuni are petit point and

snake eye. These techniques use

very small pieces of stone, usu-

ally turquoise or coral. Each

small piece is precisely shaped,

then aligned resulting in a stun-

ning pattern. The needlepoint

technique is used primarily in

bracelets and rings.

In all of their work, the Zuni

focus on the beauty of the

stone.

Today, Zuni artisans carry on

in the time honored tradition of

their ancestors, and jewelry

aficionados include Zuni work

among their prized possessions.

Weavings or pottery, kachina

dolls or Plains Indian art, con-

temporary or historic, all are

priceless if you love them.

Having your art financially

appreciate is a bonus. Although

you shouldn’t count on appre-

ciation, you

may

, by making

smart choices, find things that

We get this question all of the

time, from beginning collectors

to people that have established

extensive collections over the

years.

Our answer to them is to invest

into something that you will

want to live with for the next 30

years.

you love also will appreciate

over time. The longer you re-

tain your art, the more valuable

it is likely to become.

Keep in mind that art is not

liquid, and that beauty and

value are in the eye of the be-

holder.

While it is difficult to place a

W

HERE

S

HOULD

I I

NVEST

? P

OTTERY

O

R

W

EAVINGS

O

R

S

CULPTURE

?

Channel Inlay Bracelet

Buckle with inlay of coral,

jet and mother of pearl

Snake Eye Bracelet

There are 21,000 rock art stories

at Three Rivers Petroglyph Site

value on art, two people loving

the same piece can drive a sales

price beyond expectations.