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Phone: 866-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, IL 60118

Arts of Native America

H

ONANIE

C

ONTINUES

A S

PIRITUAL

H

OPI

T

RADITION

Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

This was a difficult time for the

young Hopi boy. He says that

his white friends couldn’t cope

with him because he was In-

dian.

He moved back to Hopi at thir-

teen where he settled, and even-

tually met his wife.

Philbert began to carve in the

1980s, creating the traditional

style of Kachina doll. His work

began to appear in major galler-

ies, and he even did a one-man

show in Hawaii.

To Philbert Honanie, Kachina

doll carving is more than an art.

He will tell you that carving is

not only a Hopi art form, but

that it is a spiritual tradition.

“They say that one of these

days when you pass away,

you’re going to become a Ka-

china,” says Philbert.

Honanie was born at Hopi and

he is member of the Coyote

Clan at Hotvela. But growing

up wasn’t an easy thing to do.

He was placed into foster care

when he was just nine, and

spent several years living in

Philbert takes carving very seri-

ously, believing that each doll

embodies the spirit of the Ka-

china.

Philbert talks to his dolls as he

carves them. He tells them that

he knows they will find a good

home, and asks each for the

opportunity to successfully care

for his family.

Philbert is a regular at River

Trading Post, and we’re de-

lighted to display an extensive

grouping of his dolls in each of

our galleries and on our web-

site.

Philbert Honanie carves at River

Trading Post—Santa Fe

Broad Faced Kachina Doll

by

Philbert Honanie