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2006 - 2007 IACA A

RTI ST

O

F

T

HE

Y

EAR

A

MELIA

J

OE

-C

HANDLER

F

EATURED

A

T

RTP

Trading Post Times

Page 2

Amelia Joe-Chandler is Diné

(Navajo). She is of the

Bitterwater (her mother’s) Clan,

born for the Mud (her father’s)

Clan.

Amelia’s Navajo culture is a

powerful part of her life, and

parts of that culture emerge

beautifully in her contemporary

jewelry designs.

She holds a Bachelor of Science

from New Mexico State

University, and a Master of

Science from Indiana

University (both degrees in art

education.)

The Diné Philosophy of Life

encompasses air, fire, water and

earth along with the four sacred

directions, colors, plants and

mountains.

Amelia’s contemporary

creations contain these sacred

elements, though she will not

combine them witin a single

piece.

Each of Amelia’s pieces tell a

beautiful visual story of the

Navajo people and their land.

At the right are both sides of

her

Monument Valley Sunset,

made of Sterling silver and

Montana agate.

Grey Wolf is an exception. He

works to keep tradition alive,

through his contemporary

work.

Grey Wolf was raised in the

Black Hills of South Dakota.

Of Oglala Sioux heritage, Grey

Wolf is well known throughout

the Black Hills for his contem-

porary parfleche work.

The Navajo people continue

the time honored tradition of

weaving, the Pueblo people

continue to create their beauti-

ful pottery, and the Hopi con-

tinue their carving tradition.

But the Plains people typically

are lost in the shuffle of con-

temporary art that preserves

tradition and culture.

Each design is carefully re-

searched, and each parfleche is

created in the old way, using

elk rawhide, deer skin, trade

cloth and clay paints.

River Trading Post recently

discovered Grey Wolf’s work,

and it has become extremely

popular with our collectors.

G

REY

W

OLF

K

EEPS

T

RADITION

A

LIVE

A Grey Wolf Parfleche Case With an

1860’s Apache Design.

Amelia Joe-Chandler

You will have a good re-

cord of history

It helps if there is a prob-

lem or concern with an

item

It helps failing memory

It is good for insurance

purposes

It is good for family mem-

bers who someday may

have your collection

You never know when the

emerging artist you pur-

chased a piece by becomes

the next award-winning

artist.

At River Trading Post we help

folks manage their collections

by providing a Collector’s Cer-

tificate, including a picture and

information about the item

purchased. These are perfect

for inclusion in your journal.

It is interesting and helpful to

keep receipts and certificates

covering items in your collec-

tion.

You might even keep a journal

with details of your purchases

along with a photo of your

items.

The Department of Interior

suggests that records of your

collection are important be-

cause:

C

OLLECTORS

T

IP

: K

EEP

R

ECORDS

A

BOUT

Y

OUR

C

OLLECTION

Keeping Records of

your Native American

art collection is

important for all

kinds of reasons.

Monument Valley Sunset

Amelia Joe-Chandler