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O

LD

W

AYS

R

ECALLED

I

N

N

EW

T

RADITIONAL

K

ACHINAS

Trading Post Times

Page 2

One day in the 1970’s a Hopi

carver named Manfred

Susunkewa recalled how Ka-

china dolls looked when he was

a child in the 1940’s. They

were not the highly detailed,

precision carved versions com-

monly found today.

In fact, his memories were not

at all of finely carved objects,

but of awe and respect learned

in the kivas late at night. He

didn’t believe that the modern

Kachina dolls properly ex-

pressed those deep experiences

he had learned as a child.

Susunkewa decided to return to

the old way of making Kachina

dolls.

The New Traditional Kachina

dolls have many of the features

of those carved between 1880

and 1930. Simply, sometimes

crudely carved, they are meant

to be simple expressions of the

Kachina spirits. They are often

painted with mineral pigments

and are intended to be hung

from the wall, as you see in any

traditional Hopi home.

Today, you can see the work of

top New Traditional carvers at

River Trading Post.

The work of Manfred

Susunkewa is featured at River

Trading Post, along with that of

Manuel Chavarrea, Cliffton

Lomayaketwa and other top

carvers.

Interestingly, collectors also

have found that these beautiful

works also fit nicely into even

the smallest budget. We think

that the New Traditional Ka-

china doll is one of the most

undervalued items in the Native

American art market. Probably

not for long though.

eral thousand other tribal mem-

bers live outside the Pueblo and

return for community gather-

ings and religious ceremonies.

The pueblo, which reaches five

stories in some places, has walls

several feet thick, and is con-

structed entirely of adobe

bricks. The original condo-style

dwelling, the pueblo is made

up of individual homes that

share common walls, but have

no connecting doors.

Today, traditional arts and

crafts, tourism, and food con-

cessions support many people

at Taos. It is a great place to

take a walking tour, and return

to the various shops for won-

derful shopping.

Taos Pueblo is a beautiful and

amazing place. We love it .

One of the oldest continuously

inhabited sites in North Amer-

ica is Taos Pueblo in New Mex-

ico.

Home to the Tiwa-speaking

Taos Indians, Taos Pueblo sits

largely unchanged since it was

built between 1000 and 1450

AD. Roughly 150 people still

live traditionally, without run-

ning water or electricity. Sev-

F

AVORITE

P

LACES

: T

AOS

P

UEBLO

River Trading Post

7140 East 1st Avenue

Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

480-444-0001

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, Illinois 60118

847-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

Whether you are decorating

your home, or are an avid col-

lector of fine American Indian

art, you will find River Trading

Post has a great mix of historic

and contemporary art from

over 50 tribal nations.

Come visit. Enjoy!

T

WO

G

REAT

C

OLLECTOR

E

XPERIENCES

Taos Pueblo

He-li-li (Shoo) Kachina

by Manfred Susunkewa