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Phone: 866-426-6901

www.rivertradingpost.com

314 N. River Street

East Dundee, IL 60118

C

LASSIC

Y

E

I

W

EAVING

D

ISPLAYED

A

T

RTP

S

COTTSDALE

ing ceremonies held in the Fall

and early Winter. During these

ceremonies, the dancers assume

the role of intermediaries be-

tween the gods and the human

race.

This weaving was highly con-

troversial in its time. Many

Navajo people believe that de-

pictions of deities and ceremo-

nies should be totally off limits

as subjects for weavings, espe-

cially if the weaving was for

sale. The belief is held by many

of today’s weavers also.

A weaving like this is very rare,

and difficult to find. This is one

of the few its kind on the mar-

ket today, to the best of our

The classic weaving shown here

is of a single Ye’i dancer that

dates back to the late 1890’s or

1900’s. The dancer is sur-

rounded by Valero stars, an

influence of Rio Grande weav-

ing, and a fox pelt hangs from

his kilt.

This weaving may have been

created by Yanapah Simpson,

who was married to a trader

and lived in Farmington, New

Mexico. But old traders in

Lukachukai and Shiprock also

encouraged this style of weav-

ing during that time.

The Ye’i Bi Chei also are called

Winter Gods and Grandfather

Spirits and are the focus of heal-

knowledge.

We are aware of at least two

similar

weavings.

The one

pictured in

the inset is

part of the

River Trad-

ing Post

permanent

collection.

The other is in the collection of

the Peabody Museum.

This is the kind of great old

weaving that becomes a part of

a great collection, and has a

habit of staying there for a very

long time, indeed.

Arts of Native America

A controversial weaving in its

time...and still controversial

today in the minds of many.